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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and new jersey. jim axelrod is at battery park in manhattan, which was inundated with water. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. high tide has come here. at least in this part of battery park, the water is not threatening to come over the wall, which is at least one piece of good news in a city that is facing more than its share of trouble. superstorm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew that this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> reporter: actually, sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 pm the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan, 14.88 feet breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> it's the unknown. it's the storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars were quickly covered, ground zero was en engulfed and across the harbor in brooklyn, so much flooding at coney island that emergency responders couldn't reach the area. the corrosive sea water headed undergrou
evacuated. jim axelrod has more from lower manhattan. >> reporter: good morning. new yorkers pride themselves on being intrepid. and right now we still have some people walking along the wall here in lower manhattan. in a couple of hours if they're here, we'll have to look for another adjective other than intrepid. the big worry here is that the surge of water could be as high as 11, 12 feet. that would get over the wall, into the subway systems and electrical systems, and that's what the big catastrophic worry is here in lower manhattan. the transit system shut down schools shut down. 375,000 people from the lowest lying areas in new york have been evacuated as the biggest city braces for the impacts of hurricane sandy. charlie? >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> meteorologist from cbs 4 has been watching sandy closely. jeff, this is getting scary based on reports you're pulling in. it sounds like this is getting worse. >> good morning, nor amp good morning, everyone. yeah. this storm is getting a little bit worse in the atlantic now. you see that the core of th
the storm. buses are running and roads are reopening but the subways are still closed. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the sea water that came over that wall and flowed into the underground power stations and subway stations has crippled lower manhattan. and new york city transit officials say this is the biggest disaster to ever hit the transit system. superstorm sandy may have moved on but parts of new york city remain paralyzed in her wake. >> restoring power and mass transit remain the two biggest challenges in the days ahead. that recovery is a mammoth job. >> it's the worst thing that happened to this city certainly since 9/11. >> reporter: new york city subway system which averages more than 5 million commuters per work day is closed indefinitely because all seven subway tunnels linking manhattan to brooklyn and queens are flooded. at some stations near battery park where monday's surge of sea water hit hardest stairwells looked more like swimming pools. >> there was no way to prepare that would have kept the water out. >> rep
in hard-hit new york city where president obama has just declared a state of emergency. jim axelrod is at battery park in lower manhattan which was inundated with water. good morning. >> reporter: when i spoke to police commissioner ray kelly here yesterday, i asked him what his biggest concern was about the approaching storm. he didn't hesitate. blackouts, he said. that's exactly what new yor this morning. super storm sandy made landfall late monday. a wet and windy nightmare. >> we knew this was going to be a great, dangerous storm. the storm met our expectations. >> reporter: sandy exceeded them. around 9:00 p.m. the storm produced a record surge at battery park in manhattan. 13.88 feet. breaching the sea wall and flooding the area. manhattan's waterfront seemed to disappear as the surge rushed over the wall. >> unknown. storm of the century. >> reporter: roads and cars were quickly covered. ground zero was engulfed. across the harbor in brooklyn, there was so much flooding around coney island that emergency responders couldn't reach the area. corrosive sea wa
. but service is limited and the city faces another day of serious transportation trouble. jim axelrod is at the tip of lower manhattan outside the staten island ferry terminal. good morning, jim. >> reporter: good morning. big step for new yorkers and a psychological boost, to at least have partial subway service restored and to ease some congestion on the roads. there won't be any subway trains coming in and out of here. not today, not tomorrow. not for a while, it would seem. three days after superstorm sandy swept through new york, the city's road to recovery is literally gridlocked. >> traffic is terrible, man. takes 45 minutes just for four block blocks. it's horrible. >> reporter: commuters turned manhattan streets into parking lots. a telling sign of just how badly the city needs its mass transit system back. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: this morning 14 out of 23 subway lines will begin operating. but none will be able to run below 34th street in manhattan and into brooklyn. multiple tunnels and stations in that area remain flooded with sea water.
of serious grid lock. jim axelrod is in lower manhattan. >> reporter: that's a crucial piece of news. 227,000 customers still without power in manhattan, although we are told now by saturday power should be restored fully in new york. now, as for the traffic that we're talking about, the massive traffic situation, city's bridges and tunnels absolutely choked with vehicles. traffic lines stretching for miles. through midnight tonight, police will refuse entry into new york for vehicles less than three passengers. public transportation is helping, although lines for shuttle buses reached three hours yesterday. getting rid of water is the top job here. a group of what's called unwatering experts from the army corps of engineers is here to help and they expect to suck out about 10 million gallons of water. from california, 70 power trucks are being air lifted here to help restore power. but the bottom line, charlie, is the more -- the quicker the power is restored, the sooner congestion will be reduced. charlie, norah? >> jim axle rodriguez, thank you. >>> the cia is fighting back against cha
this morning while drivers could see another day of serious gridlock. jim axelrod is in lower manhatt manhattan. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. this gives you a pretty god idea of what the commute is like on this friday morning. the traffic signals are out. because there's no power. that creates quite a bit of chaos at the intersections as these negotiations go on about who is going to get the right of way. all over the city, as we said, chaos. the bridges and tunnels choked with vehicles. traffic stretching for miles. through midnight tonight police will continue to turn away cars with less than three passengers. public transportation, lines for shuttle buses reached three hours yesterday. getting rid of water that's still flooding out tums and roads. tough job here. army corps of engineers is here to help, planning to suck out 10 million gallons. trucks being air lifted here to help restore power. pretty simple equation. the quicker they get power on, the quicker the congestion will be reduced around new york. con ed, the power company that takes care of new york city says by tomorr
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)